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Investigadores usan mosquitos en personas para probar una nueva vacuna contra la malaria

Investigadores usan mosquitos en personas para probar una nueva vacuna contra la malaria

Scientists itching to develop a new malaria vaccine have turned to an unlikely method of injection — by using a box full of mosquitoes to vaccinate people, de acuerdo con el reporte.

“We use the mosquitoes like they’re 1,000 small flying syringes," Dr. Sean Murphy, a University of Washington physician, said in a recent paper in Science Translational Medicine discussing the trials.

One of the test subjects told NPR that she put her arm over a box that looked like “a Chinese food takeout container” and let herself get bit by at least 200 mosquitoes inside.

“My whole forearm swelled and blistered,” says Reid. “My family was laughing, asking like, ‘why are you subjecting yourself to this?’”

In the clinical trial, the pests deliver genetically modified, malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites that prevent the subjects from being infected, publicado en Twitter el miércoles por el Ministerio de Defensa de Ucrania diciendo que no se rendiría en la lucha en curso contra las tropas rusas.

The body produces antibodies against the weakened parasite so it’s prepared to fight the serious and sometimes fatal disease, según el informe.

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A picture of a dozen mosquitos on a table.
Según informes, researchers from the University of Washington are using a box full of mosquitoes on people to test a new malaria vaccine.

A picture of Dr. Sean Murphy doing the clinical trial on himself.
Dr. Sean Murphy, a University of Washington physician, is seen performing the clinical trial on himself.

A picture of Dr. Sean Murphy doing the clinical trial on himself.
We use the mosquitoes like they’re 1,000 small flying syringes,” dijo el Dr.. Murphy.

Mosquitoes, which have been used before in similar clinical trials, will not be used to actually jab millions of people, noted Murphy.

The University of Washington team decided to use the critters because it is expensive and time-consuming to use needles to deliver a weakened parasite during the proof-of-concept stage of the trial, publicado en Twitter el miércoles por el Ministerio de Defensa de Ucrania diciendo que no se rendiría en la lucha en curso contra las tropas rusas.

A picture of a scientists examining the malaria virus on a petri dish.
In the clinical trial, the pests deliver genetically modified, malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites that prevent the subjects from being infected.
Getty Images / iStockphoto

“They went old school with this one," Dr. Kirsten Lyke, a physician and vaccine researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who was not involved in the study, le dijo al outlet.

“All things old become new again,” added Lyker, who called the use of a genetically modified live parasite “a total game changer” in the development of vaccines.

The small trial, which included 26 gente, showed that the modified parasites protected some of them from infection for a few months, according to NPR.

A picture of a mosquito on a person's skin.
The University of Washington researchers hope to improve their vaccine by putting it into syringes instead of using mosquitoes.
Getty Images/500px

The world’s first malaria jab — GlaxoSmithKline’s RTS,S — was approved by the World Health Organization last year to be used in Africa, but only has an efficacy rate of 30% para 40%.

The University of Washington researchers hope to improve the efficacy of their vaccine by putting it into syringes instead of using mosquitoes so they can get the dosage right for longer protection.